Tuesday, January 27, 2015

Home News Alternatives eyed for methyl bromide

Alternatives eyed for methyl bromide

Researchers are looking at alternative treatment that includes molasses

Staff | March 16, 2011

Researchers with USDA's Agricultural Research Service (ARS) are examining whether a cropping system that uses molasses to stimulate microbial activity could be used to replace methyl bromide. They also are studying recently developed fumigants.

ARS scientists Erin Rosskopf and Nancy Kokalis-Burelle and former ARS research associate David Butler raised bell peppers and eggplant at the agency's U.S. Horticultural Research Laboratory in Fort Pierce, Fla., to test a combination of composted broiler litter, molasses and anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD). In ASD, topsoil is saturated with water and covered with a plastic tarp. Then, a carbon source—in this case molasses—is added to stimulate microbial activity.

The scientists found nematode populations were reduced when treated with molasses and poultry litter, that molasses and poultry litter controlled grass weeds just as well as methyl bromide, and that the solarized treatments heated the soil to levels that were at or just below levels that are lethal for many soil pathogens.

Read more here.

Top news

California drought could end through powerful storms

The storms, known as atmospheric rivers, pull moisture from the tropics.

Vote for the plant with the best story at IPM Essen

The 'Show Your Colours' Award will be presented Jan. 29 in Essen, Germany.

Young industry leader passes away

Joseph 'Joe' Lutey, 32, retail manager at Wojo's Greenhouse, survived by wife, son.

Earth-Kind Rose team earns Vice Chancellor’s Award

The team was recognized Jan. 6 in College Station, Texas.

VT's Hahn Horticulture Garden gets new director

Robert McDuffie took the position on Jan. 1.

x